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LOST Theatre information

LOST Theatre is an amphi style theatre with two rehearsal rooms, a bar and a art gallery.

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Opening Hours
Opening Hours
MON

10:00 - 22:00

TUE

10:00 - 22:00

WED

10:00 - 22:00

THU

10:00 - 22:00

FRI

10:00 - 22:00

SAT

10:00 - 22:00

SUN

10:00 - 22:00

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What did you think of LOST Theatre?

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LOST Theatre reviews



By Mel M.

I have just been to see "tomorrow I'll be happy" at The Lost Theatre It's a new play by Jonathan Harvey and it was brilliant. This is the second production that I have taken my street-wise 14 year old to and I am so glad we made the effort to travel to Vauxhall. It was thought provoking, beautifully acted and captivating. The dialogue was witty, current and entertaining. We all loved it (I took my husband too) And best of all it's only a tenner so we can afford to go more often. It's also on for one night only at The Soho theatre on Tuesday 30th April Well worth the mid-week effort and it's only an hour so you can still get the bus home.


By Venetia T.

Plays international on Playhouse Creatures:nowadays girls flock to drama schools; but time was when the profession was regarded as not for ladies. You wouldn’t have seen a woman on the stage until the 1660s; and even then they were regarded as little more than streetwalkers. But then, as now, a girl had to use her assets; and delivering an epilogue might land a royal lover. Enter Nell Gwynne, played by Clare Fitton. In Playhouse Creatures (black Ram Theatre, Diss Corn Hall) by April De Angelis she has all the ‘unfettered profanity’ described by Pepys. Or at least the language of a modern girls’ locker room. From Nell’s first performance, when she stands like a frozen heifer, through her meteoric rise, you begin to see what charmed the public and attracted royalty. Her contemporaries, played by Gillian Dean and Elizabeth Davidson, are as bold as brass and tough as old boots, as actresses probably were. Annie Julian, as Mrs. Betterton, has a touch of Maggie Smith. There is a real sense of history as you see her as Cleopatra and Lady Macbeth, the first time a woman would have played these roles. Penny Lamport’s Doll Common is a gem, like an old peasant who has emerged from a Breughel painting to have a moan about life in colourful language. The play, directed by Sheila Welland, highlights an important time in the rise of women’s rights. By Basil Abbott